Languages, other than English, are Not Available at this time, Check Back Soon!
English
Espanol

  Laura M Richter
  President and CEO
  30 East 72nd Street
  Suite 16
  New York, NY
  10021 U.S.A.

  Mailing Address:
  78 Saint Moritz Dr
  Erial, NJ 08081 U.S.A.

  Tel: 212 452 1231
  Fax: 212 452 1231
  Email: ipif@ipif.org

  Susanne Bross Emmerich
  Founder

  Join Us on Facebook
  Ipif IP Profile
  IP WORLD Community Group

  Incontinentia Pigmenti International Foundation



EYES
The majority of IP patients have normal vision. Some problems, like near- and farsightedness, are common in IP individuals, but these are probably no more frequent than in the general population without IP. The classical eye finding in IP is an abnormality in the growth of blood vessels in the inside of the eye (the retina). Growth of abnormal blood vessels and the associated scarring can cause loss of vision but may be treated if recognized early enough.

For this reason, babies diagnosed with IP should have an eye examination immediately after birth and be followed by an ophthalmologist closely during the first few years of life. Careful examination by a pediatric ophthalmologist or retinal disease specialist should be done 3-4 times in the first year, then every 6 months until age 4 years, then annually. Please go to Eye Examination of Children Affected with IP for a detailed explanation of how to examine the eyes of an IP patient.

Rare eye abnormalities have included small eye (microphthalmos), cataract, and degeneration of the optic nerve (optic atrophy). Permanent visual deficiency or total blindness may occur.

ipif Links
Eye Examination of Children Affected with IP

Disclaimer

Languages, other than English, are Not Available at this time, Check Back Soon! Spanish